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Tag: writing-article

How to Collaborate on a Novel

So I just completed a book. Rather, four books and am currently working on the fifth in the series. All of these were written since July 2020. Brand new books. In addition, I wrote a reader magnet–an entire free prequel to the series that I and my co-author are giving away for free (more on that below) So by my reckoning, that works out to more than a book a month. That’s a lot of books.

For those needing some proof, here’s a link to Book One, SPLICE: Zero-Point Awakening Episode One.

How to Collaborate on a Novel

So how did I write so much so quickly?
That’s simple. I didn’t. All of these books were written by ZZ Adams. These are all co-authored by my writing partner, Damian J. Clay and me. ZZ Adams is the pen name we came up with for this collaboration. I think the quirky sound of it works great for the kind of funny sci-fi adventure and fantasy we write.

It is because of our collaboration and the techniques we have learned and applied that we have been able to successfully do so much at the standard we have.

Unsure what kind of standard that might be? There’s an easy way to check. Sign up for our ZZ Adams mailing list and you’ll receive several free books and stories.

This includes the prequel to the Zero-Point Awakening series, SIEGE.
https://www.subscribepage.com/zzadams_copy_copy_copy

You will be able to judge the quality of the writing from that and see what a good working collaboration can achieve in a few short months if you put your mind to it and apply a few simple rules and processes.

So what are all these lessons you keep going on about?

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Hook, Line and Sinker — Story Openings (Part 2)

In my last post on this topic ( Part1) we covered some of the basics of story openings or hooks.

Going back to my opening line from The Mask of White and Red:

Ilsa’s first memory was of fire.

Something is clearly wrong when someone’s first memory is of fire. There’s no nurture there, only trauma. We instinctively know that there must be a reason for that. There must be a story there. It intrigues us. It entices us and we read on to find out more about Ilsa and learn what happened to her (the What question) and then finally why this happened to her (the Why question) as well as what she’s going to do about it. And ultimately, will she prevail? Your first line needs to set all of this up. If it doesn’t, Discord is going to win.

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Baby in the Blender: How I Learned to Love Critique

We all write for different reasons, but sometimes I think that deep down, I think part of the motivation for writing at all is that we want to be loved. Just a bit. Maybe that’s why we take it so hard when people point out the flaws in our writing. It feels like rejection, and it hurts.

Let me paint you a picture.

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Hook, Line and Sinker — Story Openings (Part 1)

The Hook

Distractions. The world is full of them. The modern world even more so. There are a thousand things a potential reader could be doing other than reading your story (or novel, or screenplay, etc.). Even a reader who is willing to cooperate–who has made the commitment to spend time in your story with you–still has thoughts going off in the back of their mind. The siren call of their phone, the expectation that their kids will come home soon, the ever-present question about whether they really did turn off the gas. There are any number of reasons why even the most willing reader will put your story down. Then there are editors.

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